Several existing applications were scavenged for parts:

Scrunch Edit, a two-pane outliner for Org Mode and Markdown files
Clinklog, a static site generator for linklogs and microblogs
BrutalWiki, a wiki engine based in Brutalist design principles

Other third-party apps served as inspiration:

TiddlyWiki, a non-linear personal web notebook
Feather Wiki, an app for creating personal non-linear notebooks

Frustrations over their issues with accessibility, performance and preservation were the main impetus behind AntiWiki. But other application models were also considered and rejected:

Ikiwiki, a wiki compiler

Or so it's called by its creators, but in reality it works more like a SSG, at least when it's not running in dynamic mode, like a "proper" wiki. Also it works off a directory full of text files, which gets unwieldy fast.

Zim, A Desktop Wiki

This is the closest thing to AntiWiki out there, down to the implementation language. Zim is much more powerful, complete with a rich text editor and subpages, but also has a couple of show-stopping problems:

  • Its wiki syntax is very limited, lacking even blockquotes!
  • Keeps its data in a directory full of text files. See above.
  • (Also the included templates are horrid, but that's fixable.) The search continues.