Felix Rambles

Another step to taking back control

Meeting an old friend again: Puppy Linux

11 September 2019 — Felix Pleşoianu

The last time I used Puppy Linux for any length of time must have been 15 years ago, or almost. Much has changed in computing since. In 2018, on my first attempt to revive a laptop almost as old, the ole' pupper didn't have 32-bit support anymore. I walked past, thinking they had fallen into the trap of planned obsolescence like so many others. But Devuan Linux, my choice at the time, didn't work out for a number of reasons, and when I decided to try again this autumn, neither did Debian 10, which even in text mode makes the poor machine run hot enough to worry me. After seriously considering NetBSD, and rejecting it (not for the first time), a second look at the Puppy website revealed those ever more elusive 32-bit editions were now available for all the official, actively maintained versions. I grabbed the latest one: 8.0, codenamed Bionic Pup. Not the best choice in retrospect, given the target hardware.

Speaking of which, this is a single-core Celeron M running at 1.6GHz, with 512M of RAM and a SiS 630 video adapter whose driver was retired from X.org at some point. You'd be surprised how well it can (still) run modern Linux if a sane init system is used. In fact Puppy boots faster on it than the much older distribution on the newer, beefier machine I'm using to write these lines. The first-boot setup wizard is comprehensive, even allowing the screen resolution to be picked from a list, and installation is dead simple, taking up a directory on any available partition. Since it doesn't disturb what is already there, dual boot was an easy choice.

Puppy is such a friendly animal, bundled with a surprising number of apps for its tiny size, and more graphical setup utilities than Mageia. Newcomers can probably get away with doing like I did: grab the latest version, boot from the live CD (yes, CD!) and follow the prompts. Linux experts might want to skim the wiki and forum first, to learn about the things Puppy does in its own way. Like how each edition is slightly different, as members of the community express themselves. Or how you can trust an older version, as the base is self-contained and rock-solid while packages still get updates simply because people care. Bigger additions can take the form of filesystem overlays, that are more robust than packages but must be retrieved manually, which takes a bit of poking around.

That was where the hardware showed its age, in fact, as LibreOffice 5.4.3 barely started. Maybe if I had remembered to close the browser first. Oh well. If anything, the surprise was how well everything else worked. Also how good it all looks. (Better than the 64-bit edition in my opinion.) I did run into a bug where the desktop sometimes freezes, but switching to another virtual console then back to X fixes it. Might be my ancient, oddball hardware, or lack of RAM.

As of this writing, the one thing left to try is installing the firmware for my Broadcom wi-fi adapter. Wish me luck!

Tags: linux, software, review

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