Felix Rambles

Another step to taking back control

Puppy Linux Redux

23 September 2019 — Felix Ple┼čoianu

Nearly two weeks ago, I wrote about my experiences trying Puppy Linux again for the first time in way too many years. It proved much more useful than expected, and right now it's the most widely deployed operating system in my household (on par with the Android devices), at three installations. Let me tell you how that happened.

But first, a couple of clarifications:

  • I failed to get the Broadcom wi-fi adapter working after all. Oh well.
  • There is, in fact, a tool to fetch and set up SFS bundles automatically, called sfsget, though in the 32-bit edition it lists just a couple of essentials.

Anyway, for my second attempt I picked the same edition, and an even more limited machine: my original Asus Eee PC 701 netbook. It has the same 512M of RAM, but only a 900MHz Atom CPU, and a 4GB (not a typo!) SSD for storage. Can't exactly afford setting any of that aside for a swap partition, which made the install process almost run out of memory. But it worked, and let's just say solid state drives plus compressed filesystems make for speedy loading. X11 on the other hand ruins the boot time. (Also, there's no way the poor machine will run a modern browser, so Dillo will have to do.) And you know what? With two distros installed, I still have three quarters of the drive free. Another success!

Now for the big test: Bringing my work computer to 2019, or almost. It's a rather beefier machine, with a dual-core Atom running at 1.6GHz, and 2GB of RAM. Too bad the 64-bit edition pretty much nullifies the advantage. Oh well, at least the HDD no longer sounds like it's dying all the time, and restarting the window manager is almost instant. Something I had to do quite often at first, both for config changes and another odd bug: after moving the main tray to the top of the screen, the application menu would often freeze while browsing through it, taking along the entire desktop. The mouse cursor would still move, but nothing else. Luckily, I can press F12 to bring up the pop-up version, pick Exit, and restart JWM.

Otherwise, LibreOffice 6.1.4 barely starts, and Thunderbird 60.0.1 is even slower! Good thing the operating system uses SysV Init and a lightweight C library (Musl), otherwise it would be unusable. Opera (58) is sluggish, too, but that's because individual tabs are swapped to disk when out of focus. Guess it will have to become my default browser, with PaleMoon only for development.

The things I have to think of in order to keep an older PC alive nowadays.

As of this writing, I still haven't tried to do all my usual work, but the essentials are there. Keeping in touch with everyone was the biggest issue, and that was easily taken care of. Might come back with a part three to wrap it up.

Tags: Linux, software, review

Comments? Tweet