Felix Rambles

Another step to taking back control

Even more Puppy Linux nonsense

26 September 2019 — Felix Ple┼čoianu

So, as of this week, I've been using Puppy Linux 8.0 full time. It's hardly ideal, but the only reasonable upgrade path for me right now. And as promised last time, there's still more to unpack.

For one thing, it turns out that much of the reason why the system felt sluggish was Compton. What's Compton? A compositor as it turned out. Which does nothing except add shadows to the windows and menus... while using a noticeable amount of CPU. It also seems to leak memory, so after several hours of continuous operation it starts thrashing, which is how I found the problem. And could it be? Yep... after disabling the compositor, the freezing desktop bug also vanished. Well, until next boot, when the damned thing auto-started again despite my disabling it. When it returned for a second time, I removed it from the base OS image altogether, at which point it finally stayed out.

Hey, programmers: an OS that doesn't obey the person at the keyboard is broken, and potentially dangerous.

Anyway, even without it, Thunderbird still thrashes horribly just starting up, while LibreOffice takes way too long to do the same. Downgrading to 5.4.3 (from the previous edition of Puppy) helped, but only a little. In desperation, I also tried OpenOffice, which is much smaller but also unusably slow. And there's nothing at all between them and the much more primitive AbiWord.

Well, "primitive". It turns out the information on the Puppy Linux wiki is badly out of date. Contrary to what it says, AbiWord 3.0.1 proved perfectly able to open a 123-page ODT file, while preserving most of the formatting. Only the table of contents looked different, though page numbers were still correct, and trying to follow the internal links did nothing. (Gnumeric seems to work fine too.)

But none of that is the operating system's fault. To its credit, Puppy was at least very stable through all this, remaining up even when I gave Opera more than it could chew by accident. Closing the offending app is hard when you're low on RAM, but Puppy somehow managed anyway. Not unlike during installation in fact.

Let's see, what else? I like the DeaDBeeF music player. It might even be able to supplant Audacity for my limited needs. As for video, after trying out the various available options and finding most of them barely functional if at all, I ended up right back at good old VLC. This is why everyone uses it, folks: it gets the job done.

Which is my verdict on Puppy Linux after several more days: it gets the job done, dammit! It's weird, full of quirks and even a few bugs, but stays put, works as advertised, and allowed me to move forward at my own pace, with my limited means. When that's more than I can say about big names, you know IT needs a shakedown.

Tags: Linux, software, review

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