Felix Rambles

Another step to taking back control

Unmaintained does not mean obsolete

15 August 2018 — Felix Ple┼čoianu

There's a mentality going around, especially in open source circles, that if a piece of software hasn't had a release in recent months, that must mean it's broken, insecure and incapable of talking to newer systems. And that's just nuts.

BashBlog, the software generating this web page, hasn't had a release since the spring of 2016. So? Do you have any trouble reading right now? Anything else wrong with it? Perhaps a security issue? Could have one, if I was using one of the supported 3rd-party services, which I don't. As for other complaints people have, judge for yourself:

"BashBlog should start using the HTML5 document type."

Why? Has the XHTML standard been deprecated in the past year or two? I didn't think so. Leave good enough alone.

"But... but... modern markup such as <header> and <footer>."

Why, you think search engines can't figure out what you mean by <div class="header">? And it's still perfectly valid markup.

"There's no pagination! What happens once you have 1000 posts listed on the archive page?"

Then your archive page will still be not much bigger than 150 kilobytes. That's a little bigger than my webcomic list, and tiny compared to most webpages today. To keep it from growing even more, you can always move the existing blog to another directory, then start anew. And no, you won't have to do that too often. If you post once per day, 1K posts will take 33 months to accumulate. That's nearly three years.

Sure, there are small additions I'm tempted to make, like screen reader hints or adding rel="tag" to the appropriate links. But are they worth the trouble? Clean, functional markup helps screen readers more than you think, and again, search engines can likely guess what it means when a page name begins with "tag". Similarly, OpenGraph metadata would be useful, but plenty of apps and services also read Twitter cards in a pinch. Hardly ideal, but it works.

If you worry about maintaining a piece of software, adding new features is a surefire way to also introduce new bugs. In other words, to require even more maintenance shortly. Make sure to weigh the costs versus benefits first.

P.S. (a few days later) Here's a very similar thought recently expressed by the founder of write.as, a service I've been paying attention to as of late.

Tags: blog, software

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