Felix Rambles

Another step to taking back control

Programmers, disconnected

12 October 2018 — Felix Ple┼čoianu

When academics examine videogames, they'll often note how much developers thereof seem to live in an echo chamber, hardly aware of any media outside of their chosen profession. If they read at all, it's the same kind of escapist fantasy that games are already derived from, itself highly derivative more often than not. No wonder the results are twice disconnected from any chance at cultural relevancy. And that wouldn't be a problem if the same developers wouldn't all but demand to be deemed culturally relevant.

(Exceptions exist, of course. Personal games and walking simulators have taken off big time in recent years. Sure enough, nobody quite knows what to make of them.)

This morning, I was pointing out how open source is inherently derivative. In the mean time, I figured out why. You know how programmers have a reputation for being nerds. It's hard not to, in a profession that often starts in one's bedroom, during high school or even earlier. Which in turn allows people to skip certain rites of passage, whose forgotten importance was teaching people to be social. And open source programmers are derided as big-time nerds even among other programmers. We're the nerdiest nerds who ever nerded, as a friend would say.

(Exceptions exist there, too, as another friend pointed out. And if nothing else, some programmers come to this profession from other fields, bringing with them knowledge of different people with different needs. There's software to help coordinate disaster relief efforts, for example, something a business would never invest in.)

For the most part, however, open source programmers are twice disconnected from the analog world. How else? For the longest time, they've been busy playing catch-up. And in their hurry to reach parity with commercial software, so they can command the same respect, they forgot to check whether the products they imitated were still serving a real purpose, or had long been reduced to solutions in search of problems, only good to create more jobs for consultants.

Look. Programming can be playful. Programming can be art. It doesn't all have to be utilitarian and pragmatic. But when most of what we do seems to cause more problems than it solves, it's time to take a step back and figure out what the hell we're doing.

Tags: programming, philosophy

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